hot springsNestled in the Quachita Mountains, Hot Springs, Arkansas, is one of those towns that tourists have historically sought. Its hot springs have been the stuff of legend since anyone can remember — Native American tribes ascribed medicinal attributes to them.

The town fell under federal protection in 1832 (and even now, it’s historic core is still the oldest federal reserve in the country today), and by the time it incorporated in 1851, its hot springs made it a resort town. In the 1920s and 30s, it was the place Al Capone and other mobsters went to get away from it all.

Today, Hot Springs retains its spa and resort beginnings with its bathhouses and fine dining, but there’s also something for the sportsman, too, from fishing to Oaklawn Racing and Gaming. It’s also a family friendly place, with state parks, museums, and a short day trip to dig up diamonds at Crater of Diamonds State Park in Murfreesboro.

This week’s historical shelter was built about 45 years after the town’s incorporation and is perfectly situated near downtown Hot Springs and the historic Bath House Row in the Quapaw-Prospect District, an area chock full of historic homes (in fact, in district’s application to be added to the National Register of Historic Places, the count was 230 historic homes within the confines of the proposed district) that sits at the base of the West Mountain. (more…)

For $350,000 and some elbow grease, someone is going to snag this bed-and-breakfast ready historical shelter on the way to Toledo Bend Lake in Shelbyville, Texas. It’s just a matter of when, and who, not if.

The Bickham House, now on the state registry of historic homes, was built around 1885 after the original home (built in 1850) was razed by fire. The builder, Frederick Lee Bickham, was the stepson of longtime Shelbyville resident J.M. Crawford.

By 1972, the land and the homes on it had passed to N.O. Thomas, Jr., who restored the main home and renamed the historical shelter “Welcome Hall.”

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historical shelterIt’s not often that you can find a property with the kind of income potential this week’s historical shelter has for less than $1 million.

But this six bedroom, four-and-a-half-bath colonial revival home in Cape Charles, Virginia, has been lovingly restored and renovated, and also had an addition to accommodate the history of the home (indeed, it pre-dates the town’s founding by almost 60 years) and the modern needs for more living space and amenities. (more…)

MamaroneckImagine a home that’s a brief drive to everything Manhattan has to offer, but also gorgeous water views that stretch from Larchmont Harbor to the Long Island Sound.

Hi — we’ve found it for you. Check out this gorgeous and luxurious 1927 Spanish Mediterranean home in the gated Edgewater Point area of Mamaroneck, New York. With four bedrooms and five-and-a-half bathrooms, this home is beautifully appointed both inside and out. (more…)

Historical shelterThe bones of the Baer Barn B&B in Fredericksburg are steeped in history — the original structure was built in 1860. But this historical shelter has seen a little bit of new construction and a great deal of upgrading, making it a seamless combination of old and new.

The home sits on 4.81 acres of Hill Country land, just outside of the main part of Fredericksburg proper. Built of log, timber, and rock, the home and guest house would be a great income generator and also a great place to plan a day of wine tours and fine dining. (more…)

WiscassetWiscasset, Maine, has been dubbed the “prettiest village in Maine,” and for a little more than $200,000, someone will get to live in a cozy, historic Cape Cod nestled within walking distance of downtown.

The seaport town was originally a Native American settlement, with European immigrants setting up shop around 1663. When Maine became a state in 1820, the town was briefly considered for the state capitol, but ultimately lost to Augusta. (more…)

historical shelterIt’s not often that we are able to bring you a historical shelter that is a) close enough to be able to attend an open house, and b) is having an open house so you can actually go see it in the flesh.

Today, you’re in luck, because we have an adorable historical storefront that could be commercial property, but is currently staged and used as a home — in the cute little East Texas town of Golden.

Close to Mineola, as a home, it manages to give up both a farmhouse country feel and an industrial loft feel at the same time. (more…)