historical shelterIt’s not often that you can find a property with the kind of income potential this week’s historical shelter has for less than $1 million.

But this six bedroom, four-and-a-half-bath colonial revival home in Cape Charles, Virginia, has been lovingly restored and renovated, and also had an addition to accommodate the history of the home (indeed, it pre-dates the town’s founding by almost 60 years) and the modern needs for more living space and amenities. (more…)

davis mansion

It’s a home designed by a famed architect, and it is also potentially the keeper of secrets of Houston elite — and now the Davis Mansion (or the Kingston-Davis House, as it’s now called) is up for sale.

Depending on who you ask, Evalyn Davis was either romantically involved with oilman T.P. Lee, was a friend to Lee, or was romantically involved with Lee and he had something to do with the death of her husband (something he always denied).

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A Concord, Massachusetts, home that was built before the Revolutionary War is on the market for the first time since 1949 — making it a perfect choice for this week’s historical shelter.

Situated right on Main Street in the city center, the Samuel Jones house was built in 1767 and has five bedrooms and one bathroom. Listing agent Amy Barrett of Barrett Sotheby’s International Realty says it’s seen more than little history  — up to and including the birth of the country.  (more…)

GUTHRIEEleven years before this week’s historical shelter was built, the town was a small railroad stop. In fact, Guthrie, Oklahoma, went from train stop to town of more 10,000 in six scant hours in 1889.

That’s right — the April 1889 land run made Guthrie a boom town in less than a day. Because of that, it was designated a territory capital almost immediately, and the state capital of Oklahoma in 1907 (although a short three years later, voters chose Oklahoma City as the new capitol).

The home that is now known as the White Peacock Inn was built in 1900. The stately Colonial Revival mansion features a two-story wrap around front porch with large square columns, a large Palladian dormer, and a one-story entrance portico with columns. (more…)

hot springsIf you’ve been looking for a second home that can accommodate a family — even the furry ones — and has plenty of amenities to offer at home and in the area, this week’s historical shelter in Hot Springs, Arkansas, may be for you.

Built in 1918 for D.D. King as a summer home, this Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired Craftsman is 4,980 square feet of house, with four bedrooms and three-and-a-half baths. It sits on 7.62 acres, and is directly across from the Hot Springs Country Club, which boasts two 18-hole golf courses and a tennis complex. (more…)

Back in the day — 1852, to be exact — Fort Clark (now Fort Clark Springs) was a bustling headquarters for the C and E companies of the U.S. First Infantry Regiment under the command of Major Joseph H. LaMotte. Nestled in Kinney County, it was meant to guard the Mexican border and protect the military road to El Paso.

During its heyday, it was home to officers like Gen. George S. Patton, Major General William Rufus Shafter (otherwise known as Pecos Bill), Gen. John Lapham Bullis, and Gen. Jonathan Wainwright. (more…)

While the town of Glenmoore, Pennsylvania, may not be on your radar as a tourist destination, we’ve found a schoolhouse conversion nestled near a 30-acre nature preserve and less than an hour from Philadelphia that is sure to move it up the getaway list.

Glenmoore does have a nature preserve, state park, and a few other things nearby for quick afternoons of fun, and is about 49 minutes up I-76 to Philadelphia if you’re looking for more citified shopping, dining, or sightseeing. (more…)

dioceseWith a substantial main house, a carriage house, and a great location in the middle of downtown Charleston, South Carolina, the Morton Waring House (currently home to the local Catholic diocese) is going to give some enterprising individual a great potential home — or even perhaps a bed and breakfast-type situation. (more…)