Mardi GrasOn a street lined historic homes, in a neighborhood full of historic homes, this week’s historical shelter may be small, but it’s also the antidote for any Mardi Gras FOMO you might be experiencing this year.

After all, if you’ve been flicking through photos of all the festivities going on right now, you might also be having a bit of internal conflict — how do you get close to all that fun, but not so close that you’re dealing the hustle and bustle of the New Orleans French Quarter?

The answer just might be in this 1919 Greek Revival building, where one of 10 units is up for sale for $299,500. Located at 1206 Chartres St., Unit 2 is the perfect pad for the occasional NOLA visitor, who wants more comfort and freedom than the usual hotel.

Courtesy of MardiGrasNewOrleans.com

And, bonus, it’s also on a few of the parade routes, but not every parade route.

The 509 square foot home is in the lower residential end of the Quarter, and is one of five Greek Revival buildings in the area that are considered architecturally significant, listing agent Wayne Wilkinson with French Quarter Realty said. (more…)

Vieux Carre It’s difficult to find an area more steeped in history — and more fun at the same time — than the Vieux Carre (or you know, French Quarter) of New Orleans.

Which is why we fairly screamed when we saw this absolute charmer of a home at the edge of the quarter, just a couple blocks from Rampart Street. In other words, close enough to enjoy the Vieux Carre entertainment, but far enough away that you can still describe the home as having a tranquil setting.

This 1897 3-bay Victorian at 915 Dauphine St. boasts four bedrooms and three-and-a-half baths in about 3,100 square feet of living space.

Gloriously maintained and obviously loved living space, we might add.

Vieux Carre (more…)

 

St. Louis Cathedral, New Orleans. Photo by Takahiro Kyono https://www.flickr.com/photos/75972766@N02/7479400566/

St. Louis Cathedral, New Orleans. Photo by Takahiro Kyono

New Orleans, dripping with charm and history, a tourism mecca known for jazz music, boisterous fun and a world-class culinary scene.  In high times (such as Mardi Gras, Jazz Fest, and bowl games) lodging rates skyrocket to the advantage of second home owners who wish to vacate and lease out their properties. And for those who don’t, attending those events is all the sweeter when they can crash in their own crib at night in the Big Easy.

Yesterday, Jon showcased some properties outside of the French Quarter, noting that he prefers quieter environs to raucous tourist areas.  But for party-hearty types who want a spot near the action, the logical place  to start shopping is the 300-year-old “Vieux Carré,” home to often rowdy (actually pretty much all the time rowdy) Bourbon Street and some of the city’s most famous bars and restaurants.  

A car is useless here. It’s faster on foot to ford through crowds of folks adhering to the local creed, laissez les bon temps rouler. Being in the center of the merriment doesn’t necessarily mean sacrificing taste. Just one block off Bourbon is 906 Royal Street, where condominium units B and F are up for sale as a duo.  The two units are set in a trio of picturesque, interconnecting townhomes built by one of NOLA’s most interesting families.

All photos courtesy of Latter & Blum Realtors

All photos courtesy of Latter & Blum Realtors

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Jackson Square 1

Katrina reminded us that New Orleans is a city built in a bowl, and that when conditions are right, water will fill the bowl. Jiminy Crickets, the city’s drink is a Hurricane. For me, that means looking for a second home on the rim of the bowl.  Fortunately, my natural inclination is to live off the ground. Unfortunately, New Orleans isn’t a city awash in high-rises.

Many of you may be thinking I’ve missed the point of being in New Orleans and that I need to focus on the classically historic structures that line the city.  Nope. While my recent trip reintroduced me to a city I’d not visited in over a decade, some things are best experienced more from afar than continually up-close. The French Quarter retains its beer-sopped streets along with the skeevy tourist and local clientele of memory. And that kind of unpredictable raucousness has never been me. It’s OK to visit, as one would a foreign land, but stepping over blacked-out barflies 24/7 isn’t how I want to live.

Sign of things to come in airport taxi

Sign of things to come in airport taxi

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