Las VegasEditor’s Note: Recently, MoneyWise revealed its list of the 40 most frugal and friendly places to retire. In a bid to provide an idea of what housing inventory is available in these cities and towns, we’re taking a look at listings in each of the cities on the list.

Not everyone can spend $1 million or more on a second home, even if it’s with the idea that eventually you’ll retire there. So when MoneyWise’s list of 40 places to retire that are more budget-friendly came out, we were curious — what kind of homes could you find in these towns?

In our last story, we looked at the 22nd city on the list — Richardson, Texas. This week, we look at Las Vegas, Nevada, and found three great homes — all for less than $315,000.

“Despite being known for its famous gambling strip, Las Vegas features a number of communities where retirees can enjoy a high-quality, low cost of living,” MoneyWise said. “A household income of around $50,000 will get you a great lifestyle here.”

“The weather is warm and dry, and the population is quite diverse. And of course, Vegas nightlife is among the best in the world, and entertainment is never far away,” the report continues. “A wide variety of healthcare centers makes this a great place for medical care, too.”

Want to see examples of what you can find in Las Vegas? Let’s jump! (more…)

Single Family Resales Only

News media loves the biggest car crash, so during the Recession, Las Vegas and a few other cities were ever-present in the headlines of bad real estate news.  The table above illustrates how deep the crater went and how far it’s returned to pre-Recession levels. For homebuyers in the market, you may have missed out on the gains from the depths of the market, but there is still room for building equity.

I say that because, as of March 2018, The Greater Las Vegas Association of Realtors reports just over a month’s supply of homes on the market with roughly 30 percent fewer homes listed this past year (but 6.4 percent more condos).  Couple that with a 15.7 percent year-over-year increase in single-family home sales prices and a 30.1 percent increase in condo prices. That translates into a median single-family home selling price of $280,000 and $160,000 for condos and townhomes.  That compares with a historical average of 5 percent annual appreciation.  All this activity and you’d think you were in Dallas.

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