Camp Woods Estate is surrounded by rich American history. Located in Ambler, Pennsylvania, the estate took its name from the adjacent 36-acre Camp Woods Land Preserve where General George Washington and his troops spent the fall of 1777 during the Revolutionary War. And the birthplace of America in Philadelphia’s Center City is only 16 miles north. (more…)

The Declaration of Independence was decades in the future when this landmark Philadelphia home was built. Located at No. 139 Elfreth’s Alley – the oldest continuously occupied residential street in America – this well-preserved treasure is the first house on the city’s most historic block.

Though most sources claim the home is circa 1703, Elfreth’s Alley Association President Neil Frauenglass disputes the age by a few years according to Philly Magazine. Association records show that the 384-square-feet lot where 139 sits was purchased in 1706, and home building on the famous historical block didn’t begin until 1724.

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PhiladelphiaWhen Philadelphia lawyer Joseph Hopkinson and his wife Emily settled into their home on Spruce Street in 1794, the country was still in its infancy. Construction on the home itself had been completed just three years prior, by cabinet maker Jesse Williams.

Hopkinson saw the country grow from a collection of colonies that banded together for independence from England to a country, watching his father, Francis, sign the Declaration of Independence. Francis Hopkinson was also credited with designing the first Stars and Stripes during the Revolutionary War and later served as governor of Pennsylvania.

But the junior Hopkinson would forge his own place in U.S. history, penning the lyrics to “Hail, Columbia,” the first national anthem — a song that would remain so until the 1890s — at his home in 1798, using a melody written by Philip Phile 10 years prior.

They would raise their 14 children in the home, which also has its place in the Library of Congress, where one can read about the composition and use of “Hail, Columbia,” and also see photos of the home from decades ago.

Nowadays, the song is still in use as the official anthem for the Vice President, but before that, it was the anthem for the President, before it was replaced by “Hail to the Chief” officially during the Truman administration.

And now, 227 years later, the home is for sale, ready for its next family of history lovers to come in and continue to maintain and love the home.

The 4,100-square-foot, five-bedroom, five-bath home has been so well maintained (and its history honored), that you can fairly envision Hopkinson putting quill to paper.Three stories high, plus a dormer fourth floor, the home immediately signals its history with a historical marker just to the left of the blue front door.

A 30-foot long hallway leads to two sitting rooms with wood-burning fireplaces surrounded by floor-to-ceiling moldings. That hallway ends with what Williams called “the piazza,” back in 1791.

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